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C++ concepts: Predicate

From cppreference.com
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The Predicate concept describes a callable that returns a value testable as a bool.

Predicate is typically used with algorithms that take input data (individual objects/containers) and a predicate, which is then called on input data to decide on further course of action. Some examples of predicate usage in C++ standard library are:

  • std::all_of, std::any_of, std::none_of Take an array of elements and a predicate as an input. Call predicate on individual input elements, and return true if for all/any/none elements, predicate returns true.
  • std::equal Take two sequences and a predicate. If sequences are of equal length, and predicate call on every pair of corresponding elements return value equal to true, consider sequences as equal, and return true. Otherwise return false.
  • std::find_if Take sequence of elements, and a predicate. Return first element in the sequence, for which predicate returns value equal to true

Description of algorithm facilities, given above, is crude and intended to explain Predicate concept in simple terms. For detailed info, refer to individual pages.

In other words, if an algorithm takes a Predicate pred and an iterator first, it should be able to test the object of the type pointed to by the iterator first using the given predicate via a construct like if(pred(*first)) {...}.

The function object pred shall not apply any non-constant function through the dereferenced iterator. This function object may be a pointer to function or an object of a type with an appropriate function call operator.

[edit] Requirements